CCF House,1 South Rd, Thebarton SA 5031 P: (08) 8111 8000 | Online Shop
Adelaide Oval

Civil Contractors Federation SA

Adelaide Oval

Adelaide Oval

A 100-WEEK construction project has made Adelaide Oval a state-of-the-art cricket and AFL stadium. “It is one of the most significant stadium developments anywhere in the world,” says Rod Hook, the public servant ultimately responsible who made the project happen.

He goes further, adding: “I am confident we can say it is a shorter timeframe than anywhere else in the world.” Down to Earth asked Mr Hook, the Chief Executive of the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure, to talk us through the multimillion-dollar undertaking. Here’s the inside story.

 

DPTI went through a process of calling tenders in 2011 and received three serious bids. One builder said it could be done within the timeframe the department asked them to bid for; the other two said it was impossible.

 

The timeframe was to prepare for an Ashes Test with a 35,000 capacity at the ground this summer and for AFL with a 50,000 capacity at the ground by late March 2014 following full completion.
The price from Baulderstone Pty Ltd (now Lend Lease Building) was within the cap but with the need to allow for issues and contingencies. DPTI was not confident of recommending this bid price to State Cabinet and went through a processwith the contractor to drive the price down another $20 million.

 

What was termed the best and final offer from the contractor was recommended to Cabinet as being within the allocated budget. Mr Hook says this is the only project he has dealt with where a budget or a cap has been set in legislation. The contract was signed in November 2011 after all parties had signed commitments about the use and sharing of facilities for cricket and football at the Oval.

 

Work did not start until late March 2012 to allow the cricket season to proceed. Work went on around games at the Oval during the 2012-13 cricket season and, of course, to be ready for the Adelaide Test during 2013-14.

 

“All South Australians should be proud that this has been delivered by what we can call a South Australian company in Baulderstone, now bearing the name Lend Lease,” Mr Hook says. He adds: “It annoys me when I hear people say we would not make it when obviously we always thought we would; they should have been cheering us to the finishing line.”

 

The contract construction cost was $450 million from the State Government in addition to $85 million paid to the SA Cricket Association to acquire the lease of the Oval and effectively the improvements that have been made by SACA. The $85 million paid off a pre-existing loan taken out by SACA to build the western stand.

 

“Our new build is $450 million capped in legislation plus $30 million provided by the Commonwealth Government for underground car parking plus $5 million to be provided by the AFL. The maximum money spent on the new build at the Oval was $485 million and we managed that adequately within the cap and the available budget.”

 

Despite criticism of the procurement process for the main civil contract by the Auditor-General in August 2013, Mr Hook says no corners were cut. “The process was thorough, transparent and has led to the appointment of a contractor who has delivered an excellent product for SA and met our timeframe and within our budget.”

The facilities

New southern and eastern stands will seat about 14,000 and 19,000 respectively. There are also 3000 new seats in front of the northern mound and heritage scoreboard. The revamped mound has 21000sq m of grass and 900sq m of timber decking around the Moreton Bay fig trees.

 

The Adelaide and Port Adelaide football teams have separate changerooms in the southern stand (a third facility will be available to the away team). In the western stand are two international-standard cricket changerooms plus two smaller changerooms. A new media pod, coaches box and interchange benches have been added to the western stand within the project budget.
Patrons have the use of multi-level atriums with concourses up to 10 metres wide, 14 escalators and eight lifts to all levels of all three stands. No-one will be more than 40m from the nearest food or beverage outlet or a toilet.

 

Seventy-seven per cent of seats are under cover. This compares with 75% at the MCG. There are two replay screens onunderground car parking plus $5 million to be provided by the AFL. The maximum money spent on the new build at the Oval was $485 million and we managed that adequately within the cap and the available budget.”

 

Despite criticism of the procurement process for the main civil contract by the Auditor-General in August 2013, Mr Hook says no corners were cut. “The process was thorough, transparent and has led to the appointment of a contractor who has delivered an excellent product for SA and met our timeframe and within our budget.”

The facilities

New southern and eastern stands will seat about 14,000 and 19,000 respectively. There are also 3000 new seats in front of the northern mound and heritage scoreboard. The revamped mound has 21000sq m of grass and 900sq m of timber decking around the Moreton Bay fig trees.

 

The Adelaide and Port Adelaide football teams have separate changerooms in the southern stand (a third facility will be available to the away team). In the western stand are two international-standard cricket changerooms plus two smaller changerooms. A new media pod, coaches box and interchange benches have been added to the western stand within the project budget.
Patrons have the use of multi-level atriums with concourses up to 10 metres wide, 14 escalators and eight lifts to all levels of all three stands. No-one will be more than 40m from the nearest food or beverage outlet or a toilet.

 

Seventy-seven per cent of seats are under cover. This compares with 75% at the MCG. There are two replay screens on the southern plaza, two in the southern pockets at 125sq m each and one of 180sq m in the north.

 

The previous 1.5 metre slope has been laser-levelled making the ground suitable for any sport requiring a flat surface. Drop-in pitches can be brought in each summer and removed each winter to be replaced by grass suitable for football.

 

On a Sunday in March 2013, some 2000 pieces of the original turf were offered to the public gratis in 300mm x 300mm pieces. The Oval is now 167 metres long (an increase of two metres) and 124 metres wide (making it narrower by nine metres).

 

Within the oval budget the southern plaza entrance provides access off War Memorial Drive to an underground carpark where vehicles can load directly to lifts.

 

The southern plaza gives direct access to the new footbridge across the River Torrens that in turn gives direct access to the Adelaide Railway Station concourse. The $40 million cost of the footbridge was not included in the oval budget.

 

The Stadium Management Authority, the SANFL and the SACA have all been provided with offices and “magnificent” dining and corporate facilities are in both the southern and eastern stands.

The heavy work

Both major steel subcontractors had very large components fabricated at yards at North Plympton and Gillman and transported on prescribed routes outside peak and normal business times.

 

This involved the use of special transportation rigs and computer simulation of deliveries and the handling of components on site. The largest pre-assembled components were 30m long and 6m wide. The heaviest loads were over 40 tonnes.

 

Mr Hook considers the most prominent feature of the Oval is its setting in a park on the edge of the city. This aspect, he says, has been retained and enhanced, with views back to the river and the city from the southern stand and to St Peter’s Cathedral and the east from the eastern stand.

 

Heritage issues were addressed in the Development Approval as well as in the Adelaide Oval Redevelopment Act, which set the parameters for the project. A Construction Environmental Management Plan was developed by Baulderstone/Lend Lease with inputs from all relevant authorities, and a Sustainability Management Plan was also in place.

 

The demolition process involved the recovery of components of the former facility such as the Victor Richardson Gates, two bays of the Clem Hill Stand, plaques and memorials, stadium seating, turnstiles, Bradman Museum items, loose office furniture, electronic equipment and kitchen equipment.

 

The Stadium Management Authority offered sports clubs and community groups across SA some 8500 flip-style seats gratis following their removal as part of the redevelopment.

 

The project aimed at 95% recycling recoverable materials. Also, with bulk earthwork involved, excavation of approximately 200,000 cubic metres of soil taken from the site was used by Renewal SA to create industrial land at Gillman.

 

Both DPTI and Baulderstone/Lend Lease committed to a target of 15% of local people “who might otherwise face employment barriers including specific disadvantaged groups”. Reports indicate a level of 22% was achieved.

 

Of the 63 trade contractors under the Baulderstone/Lend lease contract, 60 are from SA. At the peak which was during August-September 2013, 800 people were on site.

 

McConnell Dowell started work on the 255-metre-long bridge structure in March 2013 and will complete the work on schedule by March 2014.

 

Footnote: Under the players’ feet are stormwater installations and substructure that involved detailed excavation, recognised for construction engineering excellence in the 2013 CCF National Earth Awards. McMahon Services won Category Two (projects valued between $1 million and $5 million) for this work. The first part of separate contracts was for deconstructing the old grandstands to ground level and recovering all salvage items in just 18 days; the $2.1 million civil component followed.

Share This:



CONTACT CCF SA

Civil Contractors Federation (CCF SA) is an industry association that promotes, protects and represents companies and other organisations with business interest in civil (construction) contracting. The CCF SA helps its Members obtain more work, work more effectively and make more money.